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Savings / Safety Tips for Jan-Feb 2020 from All Safety Products, Inc.

 

NEW: We now have a full Health and Safety newsletter available in a downloadable .pdf format, if you would like to follow more safety news, crosswords, etc., Click here for Jan-Feb 2020 issue.

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More People Working; More Flu
 
The better the economy, the more people working. The more people working, the more flu. With the unemployment rate at 50 year lows, more people are out in the world and that means more opportunity to spread infectious disease. In December, the  CDC reported widespread flu in 16 states:  Alabama, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Workers, especially in those occupations with high public contact, should be aware that at the first symptoms of flu, they are contagious. The way to stop the flu: Stay home when sick, don't share.
 
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Make your Hearing Last for Life!
 
Whatever your age, take steps now to make your hearing last for life  One in every 10 Americans has some degree of hearing loss. That includes teenagers, children, and adults.
 
Though age is a factor, hearing loss isn't a definite condition of advancing years. By protecting your hearing, you could have excellent hearing through retirement years. Today, hearing loss is on the rise among people from their teens to their 40s.
 
The main cause of hearing loss is also on the rise: loud noise. The world has become a noisier place. Much of the high volume is in the form of sound systems in movie theaters, cars, and home theaters. And power devices like leaf blowers and snow blowers can be harmful.

There are many things you can do to preserve your hearing:
 
* Don't blast the music.
* Use earplugs when operating power equipment.
* Learn to recognize the signs of hearing  loss, and have your hearing checked.
* Early treatment of infection or disease affecting your ears is a proven way to make the most of the hearing you have.
* Chronic exposure to loud noise damages the sensitive structure of hearing, the inner ear's hair cells and the nerve fibers they contact.
* While the damage cannot be cured or reversed, the progression of hearing loss can be prevented by protecting the ears from further high-noise exposure.
*  Simple ear plugs made of foam polyurethane reduce sound by 7 to 10 decibels (dB). Use them when operating power equipment.
* Custom-fitted plugs reduce noise levels by 10 to 15 dB, which is often enough to reduce noise levels below the critical damaging threshold of 85 dB. Use them at loud stock car races.
* Properly insulated ear muffs reduce levels 15 to 25 dB. They are important for people who are exposed to gunfire or continuing loud noise.
 
If hearing protection is specified for your job, be sure to wear it.
 
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Tough Break: A Stiff-Arm Fall

Football players hit the ground hard, time after time, but they rarely break their arms.  Yet, when the average person falls just once, it's not unusual for him or her to suffer a broken arm. One would wonder: Why is that?

Football players, acrobats and paratroopers know how to fall correctly. They don't resist when they know they are going down. They relax, go limp, and try to roll as they ease themselves down with arms bent. The bent arms are important. If a person hits the ground with arms stiffened, a break is likely because the arms will take the full shock of the fall.

Plan to fall correctly, and you could avoid a tough break!
 
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Delicious Recipe: Roasted Balsamic Chicken With Baby Tomatoes
 
Heart Month special recipe is tasty and healthy  In honor of American Heart Month, here is a recipe that adheres to guidelines for a heart-healthy meal and is also delicious: roasted balsamic chicken with baby tomatoes.
 
According to a story on the Cleveland Clinic's website that included an interview with a preventive cardiology nutrition expert, a heart-healthy recipe should pay attention to fat and carbohydrates, use lean proteins and vegetables, plant-based fats, and limit any added sugars or sodium.

In this roasted balsamic chicken recipe from the website All Recipes, we've hit the high notes: it contains 38 grams of protein per serving, has 323 calories, and contains 9.1 grams of fat (just 2.8 percent of the total calories). But it gets plenty of flavor from the balsamic vinegar and Dijon mustard, two excellent alternatives to higher sodium seasonings. Garlic and just a pinch of salt round things out, along with some veggies. Though it's delicious as-is, it would also work well served over lettuce or alongside more veggies and basmati rice.

Recipe: Roasted Balsamic Chicken With Baby Tomatoes

Ingredients:
 
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, or more to taste
1 clove garlic, or more to taste, minced
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
4 large skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
1 lemon, zested and juiced

Directions:
 
1. Mix balsamic vinegar, olive oil, mustard, and garlic together in an oven-safe baking dish; season with salt and pepper.
2. Place the chicken breasts in the vinegar mixture. Marinate chicken in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours.
3. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Roast chicken in the preheated oven for about 30 minutes.
4. Add tomatoes to the baking dish and continue cooking until the chicken is no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 10 minutes more. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read at least 165 degrees F (74 degrees C).
5. Sprinkle lemon zest and drizzle lemon juice over the chicken before serving.
 
 
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About All Safety Products:
 
We are all about trying to save you money when we are able to.  It is our shipping policy to only charge you the actual shipping costs.  Sometimes there is a shipping error on our website.  We do review all orders for accuracy and pleasantly surprise our customers when we notify them of an adjustment in their favor. We make money on products, not shipping!
 
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All Safety Products, www.allsafetyproducts.com, P.O. Box 3822, Lakewood, CA 90711