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Savings and Safety Tips for April 2015 from All Safety Products, Inc.

April is National Workplace Violence Prevention Month.
It may be time to review your Workplace safety procedures in regards to violence-related injuries. In 2013, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported over 23,000 significant injuries due to assaults in the workplace. Over 70 percent were in the healthcare and social service settings. Healthcare and social service workers are almost four times as likely to be injured as a result of violence than the average private sector worker.

OSHA updates Workplace Violence guidance for healthcare and Social Service Workers.

On April 2, 2015, OSHA kicked off National Workplace Violence Prevention month by releasing an update to its Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers (PDF*).

OSHA's updated violence prevention guidelines include industry best practices and incorporate the most effective way to reduce the risk of violence in a range of healthcare and social service settings.

What is workplace violence? Extracted from OSHA Website.

Workplace violence is any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers and visitors. Homicide is currently the fourth-leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), of the 4,547 fatal workplace injuries that occurred in the United States in 2010, 506 were workplace homicides. Homicide is the leading cause of death for women in the workplace. However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a major concern for employers and employees nationwide.

Who is at risk of workplace violence?

Nearly 2 million American workers report having been victims of workplace violence each year. Unfortunately, many more cases go unreported. The truth is, workplace violence can strike anywhere, anytime, and no one is immune. Research has identified factors that may increase the risk of violence for some workers at certain worksites. Such factors include exchanging money with the public and working with volatile, unstable people. Working alone or in isolated areas may also contribute to the potential for violence. Providing services and care, and working where alcohol is served may also impact the likelihood of violence. Additionally, time of day and location of work, such as working late at night or in areas with high crime rates, are also risk factors that should be considered when addressing issues of workplace violence. Among those with higher risk are workers who exchange money with the public, delivery drivers, healthcare professionals, public service workers, customer service agents, law enforcement personnel, and those who work alone or in small groups.

How can workplace violence hazards be reduced?

In most workplaces where risk factors can be identified, the risk of assault can be prevented or minimized if employers take appropriate precautions.One of the best protections employers can offer their workers is to establish a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace violence. This policy should cover all workers, patients, clients, visitors, contractors, and anyone else who may come in contact with company personnel.

By assessing their worksites, employers can identify methods for reducing the likelihood of incidents occurring. OSHA believes that a well written and implemented Workplace Violence Prevention Program, combined with engineering controls, administrative controls and training can reduce the incidence of workplace violence in both the private sector and Federal workplaces.

This can be a separate workplace violence prevention program or can be incorporated into an injury and illness prevention program, employee handbook, or manual of standard operating procedures. It is critical to ensure that all workers know the policy and understand that all claims of workplace violence will be investigated and remedied promptly. In addition, OSHA encourages employers to develop additional methods as necessary to protect employees in high risk industries.

Wearing the Right Glove

Wearing properly sized gloves is as important as the glove you choose.

Glove Care and Maintenance

Proper care and cleaning of gloves on a regular basis is essential in maintaining quality hand protection for employees. Effective care will increase savings by affording longer glove life.

Cleaning and Washing - Most styles of gloves will perform better and last longer when they are cleaned regularly. Certain glove styles launder better than others. Consult a Sales Representative for assistance with your glove selection.

Inspection - Daily inspections are recommended prior to wearing, to assure that no significant damage to either the inside or outside surface of the glove has occurred.

Storage - Gloves should be stored in well-ventilated bins at normal room temperature free from direct sunlight.

About All Safety Products

We are all about trying to save you money when we are able to.It is our shipping policy to only charge you the actual shipping costs. Sometimes there is a shipping error on our website.  We do review all orders for accuracy and pleasantly surprise our customers when we notify them of an adjustment in their favor. We make money on products, not shipping!